Spring has sprung

Spring has sprung

Nothing quite says “Spring is in the air” like a beautiful piece of Aboriginal art, complimented by bright colourful soft furnishings. This delicious vignette displays a real confidence in the mixing of Gloria Petyarre’s soft fluid “Leaves Dreaming” with cushions in strong geometric black and white, yellow and chartreuse patterns. If only you could hear the sound of the ocean, lapping at the door!

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A lesson in minimalism

 Ronnie Livingroom

I have just completed hanging a number of paintings into a client’s recently refurbished home. Everything looks very shiny and new, awaiting that unique patina that living gives it. The space will definitely mellow and soften with time.

Aboriginal Walpiri artist Ronnie Tjampitjinpa’s bold black and white painting titled “Tingari”, 1500mm x 2000mm balances the strongly striped Robyn Cosgrove rug and compliments the charcoal patterns and textures of the couch cushions.

Mixing it up!

My client at Church Point recently purchased this beautiful painting by Kudditji Kngwarreye from me. It measures 700 × 1500mm, a little small to command an entire wall and too big to hang between doors or at the end of a corridor. After experimenting with a few spots, we found the perfect place at the top of the stairs – the dramatic impact of turning the corner and seeing it, spot lit from above, brings a really fresh energy to the space.

lindy_2In a very clever twist, my client then hung other works along side the painting to create an entire gallery wall of diverse and interesting pieces, each one different but brought together by the common thread of the colour blue!!lindy_stairwell1

BREAKFAST POINT SHOWCASES ABORIGINAL ARTWORKS

Posted by Karen Lange on September 09, 2011
I have recently installed a number of Aboriginal paintings into the new display penthouse at Breakfast Point, on the banks of the Parramatta River in Sydney.
The latest development for Rose Group, the penthouse, part of the Verandah’s complex, was styled by my colleagues at Fanuli Furniture and I was asked to adorn the walls with beautiful contemporary Aboriginal Artworks.
Rather fittingly, Breakfast Point was named by Captain John Hunter in 1788 when he put ashore to make tea and have refreshments. On the same day, it is believed he experienced his first sighting of local Aboriginals on a neighbouring island.

 

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KUDDITJI KNGWARREYE STOPS TRAFFIC!

A stunning work by Kudditji Kngwarreye hanging in the window at Macleay on Manning – one of Sydney’s most beautiful boutique retailers in Potts Point.

Commanding an entire wall of this eclectic elegant retailer, the painting, measuring 1500 × 2400mm, epitomizes how relevant and contemporary Aboriginal art is in the life of the city today.

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A SLIGHT, BUT BEAUTIFUL DEVIATION

Being an Aboriginal art addict can mean that non-indigenous work does not always get a look in!!

However the moment I met “China Boy” a highly pixelated black and white photograph by nationally acclaimed photographer Michelle Aboud, I know that we were destined to be together.
“China Boy” is sixth in a limited edition series of six photos printed onto canvas. Measuring 1450 x1450mmm square (approx) he is a striking and fitting companion to the Aborignal works by Kudditji Kngwareyye, Minnie Pwerle, Dorothy Napangardi, Barney Campbell Tjakamarra and others, that adorn my walls.
However there is an ora of innocence and charm about this boy, achieved not just by capturing a single moment in time, but also by the pixelation process of bringing together thousands of different sized individual black dots to create a work of art. At close range, the photograph reminds me of one of Dorothy Napangardi’s paintings, yet when you squint slightly, it is a fully integrated black and white photo
of “China Boy”.
Having just read “The Hare with Amber Eyes” by Edmund de Waal, I would love to know more about this small child – where he is from, what is he looking at, what has captured his attention.
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Textural harmony created using minimal palette

Fanuli Furniture, Cremorne, NSW showcase the work of Barney Campbell Tjakamarra in an exquisite manner by layering luxurious texture upon texture, to create a sophisticated, elegant vignette of calmness.

Indonesian inspired Ikat fabric cushions sit on a raw linen textured sofa, with the shot silk curtains bringing a spark of life and vitality, without disturbing the peace!

Barney Campbell Tjakamarra’s Tingari painting measures 1200 x 2000mm and has been beautifully executed in a monochromatic rich cream colour.